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Gaining Knowledge About Hair Loss

The Fundamentals Of Hair Loss

Hair grows on every surface of the human body such as  the palms and soles of our feet, our eyelids and belly buttons, yet many hairs are so thin that they are nearly undetectable. Hair is composed of a protein called keratin, which is created in hair follicles located in the skin’s outer layer. As follicles develop new hair cells, the old ones are pushed out through the skin’s surface at a rate of approximately six inches every year. The visible hair is actually a thread of decomposing keratin cells. The normal adult scalp has between 100,000 and 150,000 hairs and sheds up to 100 every day; spotting a few stray hairs on your brushes is not always reason for concern.

Around 90% of the hair on a person’s scalp is growing at any given time. Each follicle has its own life cycle, which is regulated by a range of factors such as age, sickness, and a variety of other factors. This life cycle is comprised of three distinct phases:

  • Anagen — a period of vigorous hair development that lasts between two and eight years
  • Catagen – a two- to three-week period of transitional hair growth
  • Telogen — resting period lasting approximately two to three months; at the end of the resting phase, the hair is shed and replaced by a new hair, resuming the growing cycle.

Hair growth slows down as people age.

What Factors Contribute To Hair Loss?

Doctors do not understand why some hair follicles are wired to grow faster than others. Numerous reasons, however, may contribute to hair loss:

  • Hormones, such as elevated androgen levels (male hormones generated by both men and women)
  • Genes from both male and female parents may impact a person’s tendency to male or female pattern baldness.
  • Temporary hair loss can occur as a result of stress, illness, or delivery. 
Stress
  • Hair loss can also occur as a result of ringworm caused by a fungal infection. 
  • Temporary hair loss can be caused by a variety of medications, including chemotherapy treatments used in cancer treatment, blood thinners, beta-adrenergic blockers used to manage blood pressure, and birth control pills.
  • Temporary hair loss can also occur as a result of burns, accidents, and X-rays. Normal hair growth normally resumes once the damage has healed, unless a scar forms. Hair will never regrow in that case.
  • Alopecia areata, which is an autoimmune condition. Alopecia areata occurs when the immune system becomes overactive for unexplained causes, affecting the hair follicles. Hair grows back in the majority of persons with alopecia areata, albeit it may be very fine and possibly lighter in color briefly until normal coloring and thickness return.
  • Alopecia areata, which is an autoimmune condition. Alopecia areata occurs when the immune system becomes overactive for unexplained causes, affecting the hair follicles. Hair grows back in the majority of persons with alopecia areata, albeit it may be very fine and possibly lighter in color briefly until normal coloring and thickness return.
Alopecia
  • Cosmetic operations such as excessive shampooing, perms, bleaching, and dyeing hair can contribute to overall hair thinning by weakening and brittleening the hair. Braids that are too tight, the use of rollers or hot curlers, and combing hair picks through tight curls can all cause damage and breakage. These operations, however, do not result in baldness. Hair usually regrows normally if the source of the problem is removed. Nonetheless, severe hair or scalp damage might result in permanent bald areas.
  • Medical problems. Hair loss can be caused by thyroid disease, lupus, diabetes, iron deficiency anemia, eating disorders, and anemia. Hair usually regrows when the underlying problem is addressed, unless there is scarring, as occurs in some instances of lupus, lichen planus, or follicular disorders.
  • Diet. A low-protein or severely reduced calorie diet can also result in temporary hair loss. 

Is It Possible To Prevent Hair Loss?

Hair Dye

Although natural balding cannot be reversed, you can protect your hair from damage that may eventually result in thinning.

Numerous individuals place extreme strain on their hair. Hair dryers, heated curlers, hair dyes, permanents, tight braids, and hair straightening treatments, as well as chemically laden cosmetics, can all contribute to dry, brittle, and thinning hair.

Discover what you can do to assist in reversing stress-induced hair loss. Follow these tips to avoid hair damage that may result in hair loss:

  • Leave your hair alone: Maintain its natural color and texture. If this is not possible, allow hair to heal between blowouts and chemical treatments. Avoid wearing your hair in tight braids.
  • Make prudent product selections: Utilize a simple shampoo that is suited to your hair kind. Choose less-damaging sponge rollers when curling your hair. Additionally, brush with a moderately firm, natural-bristle brush to avoid tearing your hair.
Hair Brushing
  • Proper brushing: Proper hair brushing can be just as beneficial to your hair’s condition as any over-the-counter product. Apply full strokes from the scalp to the tip of your hair with a good brush to spread the natural oil in your hair. Be gentle with your hair and avoid brushing it while it is damp, since it is particularly fragile. On wet hair, it is recommended to use a wide-toothed comb.